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Capua

Illa Altera Roma

Capua archaeological sites

Capua

Titus Livius (59 BC-17 AD) described Capua as one of the richest cities of Italy. At the time of Livius Capua extended across 200 hectares of land, and stood in the middle of a territory planted with cereals and vines, and full of trades and handicrafts, but first we need to step back even further, almost 3000 years ago…

Archaeological documents certify that the site was certainly inhabited from the 9th century BC, and that it was occupied without interruption until the Roman age.

The first phase of the settlement of Capua, by the Etruscans, is known mainly through the necropolis, the oldest part of which dates back to the middle of the 9th century BC, and was located in the north-west of the city. Already from this first stage there was some contact with the Ancient Greek world.

The territory in the  archaic age was located between the Volturno and Clanis Rivers with Mount Tifata to the north; during this period, Roman literary tradition speaks of Capua as the capital of the “dodecapoli” (“twelve cities”) in Campania.

Capua’s flourishing economy in the 7th and 6th century BC, was based mainly on agriculture, and an environment in which artistic handicrafts flourished, particularly of bronzes and clay objects, intended to meet the needs of the local aristocracy. Moreover, the city developed trade with other regions of southern Italy, and contact with the Greeks also grew more intense.

At the end of the 6th century BC the Etruscan hegemony underwent its first blow with their defeat at the hands of the Latins, aided by the Greeks of Cumae, at the battle of Aricia. Diodorus Siculus (90-27 BC) told how the people of Campania were formed “from the merger of the Italic tribes and those of Campania”.

In the Samnite age the shrines of “Diana Tifatina”, famous in antiquity, and one in “Fund Patturelli”, from which the famous “Mothers” of Capua” come were both active. It was the Samnite wars of 343 BC and an attack by the mountain people of the Sannio, followed by the intervention of Rome in defence of the town, that marked the beginnings of the Roman domination in Campania, and the Romans in 338 BC gave Capua the privilege of “civitas sine suffragio” (i.e. “citizenship without voting”).

In 314 BC Capua rebelled against Rome, but the city was forced to surrender. The defeat of Hannibal (248-183 BC), whom Capua had supported during the Second Punic War, brought in 211 BC the deprivation of the right of citizenship and the confiscation of land. The ruling class was dispersed, and the city was subdued under the jurisdiction of a “praefectus” (“Prefect”, who was the representative of the Roman authority at the place).

By the end of the 3rd century BC Capua was still the most important centre of Campania, characterized by an intense construction business and a specialized agricultural production such as that of the vine, while continued the traditions of finishing bronze and iron.

The Romanization of Capua was completed by 59 BC, when it was controlled by a colony of veterans who had fought with Julius Caesar. The Roman times were a time of considerable public and private construction, and a substantial number of monuments significantly changed the town-planning aspect of Capua.

In the 4th century AD the city was still flourishing, so much so that the poet Magnus Ausonius (310-394 AD) appointed it among the eight major cities of the Roman Empire.

How to get:

Half a highway, the city can be reached via the A1 Naples-Rome, exit at Capua located about 8 km from the city center (follow the signs to the center).

A half plane, arriving at the international airport of Naples – Capodichino take the bus 3 easily recognizable because sometimes there is the symbol of the plane above the neon sign of the bus, you take it from the airport of Naples and go down to Piazza Garibaldi, the square antistanze the Napoli Centrale railway station.

Cost of bus ticket € 1. From here you can reach the railway station of Capua in two ways:
changing train in Caserta (according to the scheme Naples – Caserta – Capua);
without carrying out any switch (from Naples to Capua directly).

Opening period:

Amphitheater Campano

Art Card inserted in the circuit of Caserta

Hours: 9.00 to one hour before sunset
Closed: Monday. Festive closing: January 1st, May 1st and December 25th

Mithraeum:

Art Card inserted in the circuit of Caserta
Hours: 9.00 to one hour before sunset
Closed: Monday. Festive closing: January 1st, May 1st and December 25th

Entrance fee:

Amphitheater Campano:

Ticket price: Adults € 2,50; reduced from 18 to 25 years: 1.25 EUR; Free up to 18 years and over 65 (only Italian citizens and EU). Integrated ticket cumulative Circuit Art Card.

Mithraeum:

Ticket price: Adults € 2,50; reduced from 18 to 25 years: 1.25 EUR; Free up to 18 years and over 65 (only Italian citizens and EU). Integrated ticket cumulative Circuit Art Card.

Tourist information:

Tel: +390823/798864

Touristic guides:

www.guidecentre.com/it/contatti.php

 

 

 

27 November 2015